Out there adventure awaits those of us with daring tastes therecord.com how to cook peameal bacon slices in the oven

You know something? Stuffed bell peppers are delicious. Now, before we get too crazy here, I should confess that I did not cut and stuff bell peppers myself. I did not make a seasoned meat and rice mixture. I stuffed nothing. I bought pre-made stuffed bell peppers at costco. I heated them and ate them. Simple. And truly, truly so good.

It made me think about what a terribly sheltered eater I have been. When I tried and liked stuffed bell peppers, I had the same feeling I had the first time I tried other exotic dishes: I wished I had tried sooner. It was like the first time I tried caesar salad, onions or tuna. Why didn’t I try these things sooner? No kidding, the first time I had tuna I was in my 20s. I was broke and thought I’d try tuna helper. I thought it tasted like a bicycle tire smells. But now I like tuna.

Food is funny.


What some of us consider a delicacy, others would not poke with a stick. My daughter will always shuffle her side of bacon onto my plate.Stuffed bell she’s all in for the eggs or pancakes or whatever she ordered but has no use for swine strips.

I can remember getting quite daring in my teens and developing a taste for certain seafood. Not exactly delicacies but I became a big fan of something called crab alfredo from red lobster. It was great. Crab meat, pasta and creamy alfredo sauce. Oh, I did have to custom order it with no mushrooms. I hate those things, but that’s another story.

I tried it again. Got sick again. I tried clams. Got sick. I ate a crab ball. Got sick. I learned my lesson (after trying lobster just once more three times) and stopped eating lobster, scallops, all shellfish, really. I have nothing against these foods but it’s a risk vs. Reward situation.

Not being able to eat shellfish isn’t really an issue for me, but it seems to be a huge issue for a lot of other people. Almost any time I am out and there are shellfish being served, I will quietly and politely say, "no, thanks." not a big deal.Stuffed bell for me.

Much like I question my daughter’s sanity and parentage when she stiff arms the bacon, I would say more often than not someone will absolutely grill me on why I don’t want the shellfish.

I try to dismiss it quietly but the conversation always persists to the only conclusion it can — with me having to explain that shellfish makes me hurl like a pressure washer. There. Happy?

I can only imagine the challenges faced by others with far more widespread dietary needs like vegetarians, gluten intolerants or people who just really, really don’t like mushrooms. But that’s another story.

There was a time I would not eat a bell pepper. Now I’m eating them as a main course. It’s exciting. It has taken me a lifetime to broaden my horizons in the smallest ways, but broadened, I have. I can hardly wait to see what my next big food adventure will be. It won’t be mushrooms. Never mushrooms. But I might try something exotic and sophisticated like french dressing.First time

I thought we should talk about food because I just tried stuffed bell peppers for the first time. Have you heard of this? It’s bell peppers, cut in half, then stuffed with a seasoned meat and rice mixture and baked.

When I was a kid, my mother would make stuffed bell peppers. I thought they were gross looking so I’d politely say, "gross. I don’t want those stuffed bell peppers. I want kraft dinner!"

You know something? Stuffed bell peppers are delicious. Now, before we get too crazy here, I should confess that I did not cut and stuff bell peppers myself. I did not make a seasoned meat and rice mixture. I stuffed nothing. I bought pre-made stuffed bell peppers at costco. I heated them and ate them. Simple. And truly, truly so good.

It made me think about what a terribly sheltered eater I have been. When I tried and liked stuffed bell peppers, I had the same feeling I had the first time I tried other exotic dishes: I wished I had tried sooner.Stuffed bell it was like the first time I tried caesar salad, onions or tuna. Why didn’t I try these things sooner? No kidding, the first time I had tuna I was in my 20s. I was broke and thought I’d try tuna helper. I thought it tasted like a bicycle tire smells. But now I like tuna.

Food is funny. What some of us consider a delicacy, others would not poke with a stick. My daughter will always shuffle her side of bacon onto my plate. She’s all in for the eggs or pancakes or whatever she ordered but has no use for swine strips.

I can remember getting quite daring in my teens and developing a taste for certain seafood. Not exactly delicacies but I became a big fan of something called crab alfredo from red lobster. It was great. Crab meat, pasta and creamy alfredo sauce. Oh, I did have to custom order it with no mushrooms. I hate those things, but that’s another story.

When I hit my 20s, I started getting sick if I ate certain seafood. The first time it happened, I thought I just ate too much.First time I thought that because I did. In one evening I put away at least a baker’s dozen bacon-wrapped scallops and shovelled a few lobster roll sandwiches into myself. I was sick all night.

I tried it again. Got sick again. I tried clams. Got sick. I ate a crab ball. Got sick. I learned my lesson (after trying lobster just once more three times) and stopped eating lobster, scallops, all shellfish, really. I have nothing against these foods but it’s a risk vs. Reward situation.

Not being able to eat shellfish isn’t really an issue for me, but it seems to be a huge issue for a lot of other people. Almost any time I am out and there are shellfish being served, I will quietly and politely say, "no, thanks." not a big deal. For me.

Much like I question my daughter’s sanity and parentage when she stiff arms the bacon, I would say more often than not someone will absolutely grill me on why I don’t want the shellfish.

I try to dismiss it quietly but the conversation always persists to the only conclusion it can — with me having to explain that shellfish makes me hurl like a pressure washer.Stuffed bell there. Happy?

I can only imagine the challenges faced by others with far more widespread dietary needs like vegetarians, gluten intolerants or people who just really, really don’t like mushrooms. But that’s another story.

There was a time I would not eat a bell pepper. Now I’m eating them as a main course. It’s exciting. It has taken me a lifetime to broaden my horizons in the smallest ways, but broadened, I have. I can hardly wait to see what my next big food adventure will be. It won’t be mushrooms. Never mushrooms. But I might try something exotic and sophisticated like french dressing.

I thought we should talk about food because I just tried stuffed bell peppers for the first time. Have you heard of this? It’s bell peppers, cut in half, then stuffed with a seasoned meat and rice mixture and baked.

When I was a kid, my mother would make stuffed bell peppers. I thought they were gross looking so I’d politely say, "gross. I don’t want those stuffed bell peppers.Stuffed bell I want kraft dinner!"

You know something? Stuffed bell peppers are delicious. Now, before we get too crazy here, I should confess that I did not cut and stuff bell peppers myself. I did not make a seasoned meat and rice mixture. I stuffed nothing. I bought pre-made stuffed bell peppers at costco. I heated them and ate them. Simple. And truly, truly so good.

It made me think about what a terribly sheltered eater I have been. When I tried and liked stuffed bell peppers, I had the same feeling I had the first time I tried other exotic dishes: I wished I had tried sooner. It was like the first time I tried caesar salad, onions or tuna. Why didn’t I try these things sooner? No kidding, the first time I had tuna I was in my 20s. I was broke and thought I’d try tuna helper. I thought it tasted like a bicycle tire smells. But now I like tuna.

Food is funny. What some of us consider a delicacy, others would not poke with a stick. My daughter will always shuffle her side of bacon onto my plate.First time she’s all in for the eggs or pancakes or whatever she ordered but has no use for swine strips.

I can remember getting quite daring in my teens and developing a taste for certain seafood. Not exactly delicacies but I became a big fan of something called crab alfredo from red lobster. It was great. Crab meat, pasta and creamy alfredo sauce. Oh, I did have to custom order it with no mushrooms. I hate those things, but that’s another story.

When I hit my 20s, I started getting sick if I ate certain seafood. The first time it happened, I thought I just ate too much. I thought that because I did. In one evening I put away at least a baker’s dozen bacon-wrapped scallops and shovelled a few lobster roll sandwiches into myself. I was sick all night.

I tried it again. Got sick again. I tried clams. Got sick. I ate a crab ball. Got sick. I learned my lesson (after trying lobster just once more three times) and stopped eating lobster, scallops, all shellfish, really.First time I have nothing against these foods but it’s a risk vs. Reward situation.

Not being able to eat shellfish isn’t really an issue for me, but it seems to be a huge issue for a lot of other people. Almost any time I am out and there are shellfish being served, I will quietly and politely say, "no, thanks." not a big deal. For me.

Much like I question my daughter’s sanity and parentage when she stiff arms the bacon, I would say more often than not someone will absolutely grill me on why I don’t want the shellfish.

I try to dismiss it quietly but the conversation always persists to the only conclusion it can — with me having to explain that shellfish makes me hurl like a pressure washer. There. Happy?

I can only imagine the challenges faced by others with far more widespread dietary needs like vegetarians, gluten intolerants or people who just really, really don’t like mushrooms. But that’s another story.

There was a time I would not eat a bell pepper.Bell peppers now I’m eating them as a main course. It’s exciting. It has taken me a lifetime to broaden my horizons in the smallest ways, but broadened, I have. I can hardly wait to see what my next big food adventure will be. It won’t be mushrooms. Never mushrooms. But I might try something exotic and sophisticated like french dressing.